Adoption Archives - Page 3 of 7 - Amara

The Adopted Life Episodes

This series, hosted by Angela Tucker, features interviews with teen and pre-teen transracial adoptees to bring awareness and education to the public about complex issues such as racial identity formation, searching for and having open relationships with birth/biological families, and, in some cases, having little to no information about one’s biological families.

White Privilege: Unpacking The Invisible White Knapsack

McIntosh describes white privilege vividly and powerfully as the idea of an invisible weightless knapsack of special provisions and more. In other words, a white person in the United States has on his or her back an invisible weightless knapsack granting favored positions, status, acceptance, and more.

10 Ways to Identify Racism

Both in schools and out, young children are exposed to racist and sexist attitudes. These attitudes – expressed over and over in textbooks and other media – gradually distort their perceptions until stereotypes and myths are accepted as reality. The 10 guidelines in this document are offered as a starting point in evaluation children’s books.

40 Ways to Increase Bi-Culturalism

Many transracial families can benefit from incorporating the adopted child’s culture of origin into their homes. For transracial families, it is often a matter of bi-culturalism versus assimilation. This document offers a list of 40 items to serve as a guide to get started.

What Teachers Should Know About Adoption

One way that children are taught about the world and people around them is through assignments that focus on When these assignments are broadened purposefully to be inclusive and respectful of many diverse family models, children growing up in “non-standard” families can relax and learn. Too often, however, these assignments are not sensitively designed.

Adoption-Unfriendly School Assignments

One way that children are taught about the world and people around them is through assignments that focus on When these assignments are broadened purposefully to be inclusive and respectful of many diverse family models, children growing up in “non-standard” families can relax and learn. Too often, however, these assignments are not sensitively designed.

Why Children Don’t Talk (Much) About Adoption

Parents often say that their children don’t talk much about adoption and don’t seem interested when parents bring up the topic. Does this mean children really aren’t concerned about adoption’s themes?

Talking with Children about Difficult History

Parents who have potentially painful information about their child’s history and/or birth family face a number of complex and difficult decisions. These decisions include: Should we share this information with our child? If so, when, at what age or developmental stage? How do we share this information? How much should we share? Who should tell